BIC F-12 Subwoofer Demo

today here at lights and buttons will be
troubleshooting a subwoofer problem in
this home theater as you can see we have
two subs one on the left and one on the
right and we will be looking at the left
one because it’s making a random
thumping noise once a while
so this thumping / popping noise happens
when the sub is actively on but I also
noticed that when I unplug the input aka
the RCA cable and nothing else is
connected to it it still makes that
sound randomly I can’t establish a
pattern and so after talking with the
EIC america tech support they also
narrowed down to a an amplifier problem
right now it looks like we need an
amplifier replacement but you know if we
can see anything obvious jumping out at
us and simple to fix without a
replacement that would be my first
choice otherwise from what I’ve heard it
won’t be that much to replace the
amplifier compared to the whole cost of
buying a new sub we have 10 different
screws around the edges to remove and
then this will pop out
right and here’s the last screw and like
my one friend said don’t forget to turn
it on to drain the capacitors that way
you avoid getting shocked
unfortunately the back panel is not
budging I’m not sure what’s holding in
the amp so I’m gonna try to see if I can
come in through the front okay we’ve got
the eight screws out and don’t mix this
up with the back screws they are
different so this looks like a plastic
trim that seals the sub box yes and this
reviews eight more screws and I think
this time you’ll remove the actual
driver back to work
the driver is now out let’s take a look
at the inside and as you can see the amp
isn’t it back alright there’s no push on
what looks like to me heatsink I’m gonna
have my hand in the back just so that I
can catch it if it does pop out well at
least didn’t glue this to the back be
careful with the wires especially with
the positive and negatives I’m gonna try
to see if we can disconnect them for the
cable I think the hardest part is just
unplugging it and finding to the tab
that will release it so on the Curly’s
side and I don’t know if this is like a
Spade connector or what the term is for
these there’s a little tab you can press
to release the cable and finding that
and hitting that part it can be tricky
alright and we have another day of fun
so after that first attempt in trying to
fix the amp I tried to blow dust away I
figured maybe some of the factory dust
might be conductive I know it’s a bit of
a stretch so I figured something that’s
free if I can fix it that’s even better
but unfortunately it didn’t do anything
so I went ahead and ordered the amp the
amp comes with the power supply I was
actually talking with my dad and he said
that the power supply might be defective
causing noise to be generated in the amp
and then you know out to the the woofer
itself so everything comes in this box
the amp the power supplied the rear
panel and I think the wiring has well
so let’s open it up and check it out
almost like everything is nicely
packaged of course got the back plate
power supply and then these will go to
the driver the ones that are currently
in the sub the positive cable isn’t
coming out easily so I might unplug it
from the driver’s side which is a little
bit annoying because they not to unscrew
the stuff in the front and then pull out
the driver and love the trim and the
driver hmm don’t make the same mistake
as I did going through this the first
time I didn’t realize that when you pull
out the back panel you can tilt it in
different ways so my first method was to
tilt it this way and then of course the
wire was pretty much maxed out and I
can’t go any further
and I didn’t want to want to risk
damaging it so I took out the pieces out
in the front but instead of doing that
if you flip the panel this way you get a
lot more room because the wires are on
this side of the panel and as a matter
of fact I can see right through and I
see the connections to the driver and if
I reach my hand in I can unplug it from
the other side because it’s kind of
stuck on this side and I’ll make things
much easier because you don’t have to
take out anything from the front and
miss so this screws out in the front of
the sub
so all we have to do is plug the cables
back in and screw the rear panel back on
that’s it for today’s video thanks for
watching hopefully this is helpful if
your running into the same situations
with your f12 don’t forget to Like share
and subscribe as always and I’ll see you
next time

BIC F-12 Subwoofer Specs

DesignFront-firing 12″ 475-watt peak powered subwoofer
Frequency Response25Hz – 200Hz
Sensitivity90dB
Drivers12″ Injection molded woofer with heavy duty surround
Gold-Plated TerminalsYES
Recommended PowerBuilt-in Amplifier Power: 475 watts Dynamic Peak, 150 watts RMS continuous
Impedance8 ohms
Dimensions17″H x 14 3/4″W x 17 1/4″D, Carton Dimensions: 22 x 19 x 21
Weight42 Pounds Each, 43 Pounds Each
Warranty5 Years – Parts

BIC F-12 Subwoofers

If you’re in the market for a quality subwoofer, the BIC F-12 is an excellent choice. Built by renowned audio manufacturer BIC, this compact 12″ subwoofer from BIC features a high powered Venturi amplifier which is capable of powering even the most powerful subwoofers. The F-12 subwoofer integrates a patented BIC “VDT” vent port which eliminates port noise that’s so often observed in other subwoofer/s. The F-12 has a variable volume control with an auto-immune control to eliminate fading from low frequencies. There are also a number of speaker terminals including left & right, lower & upper shelving, and balanced controls. The F-12 comes standard with a one-step pre-fader, a true frequency-diverting mid-range sound module, and a dual-bee direct drive system for supreme power and low distortion.

In order to properly evaluate any car audio components, one needs to properly research and evaluate the brands and models available on the market. This includes comparing and contrasting all of the major brands such as Alpine, Eclipse, Focal, Kenwood, K&N, MB Quart, JL audio, JVC, Peavey, and others. A good place to start the comparison process would be by reading reviews and ratings either online or from car enthusiasts who may have had a similar vehicle setup. By properly evaluating each of the major brands, one can determine if the BIC F12 subwoofer and amp set-up process would be an easy, fun, or a difficult experience based on the quality of the sound produced.

Once the basic subwoofer setup has been established, the customer will then need to consider their specific tastes and preferences in terms of color and style. Depending upon the intended usage and application, color may play a very important factor in the final product. If the vehicle will be used mostly in the garage, then subtle and well-kept colored BIC f12 subwoofers can help to keep the eyes away from the tires and dirty carpets while keeping the attention on the music. Conversely, if the BIC F-12 is to be placed in the main room of the house, then bright colors such as red and yellow can help to enhance the overall look of the room and keep the attention of the guests focused on the subwoofers and amplifier. Proper color matching is essential and may take some searching and some trial and error before finding the perfect match.

Another thing to consider when looking for the best budget subwoofers is that while many subwoofers are constructed with good quality parts, quality of construction is not everything. While it is important for the F-12 to have a good and sturdy platform, it is equally important that it also has the ability to produce high quality sound and reproduce it at the lowest frequencies. BIC has addressed this concern by adding a special rubber surround that surrounds the entire F-12 to eliminate any unwanted feedback or movement that could affect the quality of the reproduced sound. The result is a powerful audio system that has the capability to bring all the senses alive in the form of booming bass response and incredible detail.

The BIC F-12’s dual tweeter basket is the heart and soul of the unit. Each tweeter is perfectly balanced to hit the exact frequency axis so each voice can be delivered with pinpoint accuracy and power. It is amazing how closely they are able to reproduce the high frequencies that people usually can’t reproduce with lower quality speakers. One aspect that makes the big f12 series so popular is their ability to run extremely high volumes even with a low wattage amp. If you need that power, the BIC f12 subwoofers will be the ones to deliver it.

The BIC F-12 subwoofers come in a wide array of colors, so you are sure to find just the right one to complete your home theater or music listening needs. You can choose from black, white and clear rubber surround for a low-powered but impactful bass response. They also have red bordered enclosures for that extra touch of color and elegance. With a simple installation and a no-frills operation, it is easy to see why so many people choose BIC subwoofers for their next setup.

Last update on 2021-06-25 / Disclaimer: as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

3 verified buyer reviews
  1. First and foremost, let me state unequivocally that I am not an audiophile in any sense of the word, nor do I have much hands-on experience with high-quality subwoofers. On the other hand, I enjoy good sound, know what to expect from good equipment, and have some professional experience in audio processing/mixing, as well as 5 years of piano lessons behind me.

    I purchased the F12 because of the many good reviews I had read, because it was inexpensive, and mostly because I couldn’t bear the sound of my Polk PSW108 any longer. The latter was one of the boomiest subs I’d ever owned, with no clarity/definition to speak of, was barely audible below 40 HZ, and, most importantly for me, made a lot of chaffing noise through its front port at any volume other than the lowest. I had a similar problem with a Klipch double-firing sub from the Promedia set before, but it wasn’t as bad. According to online reports, this problem affects many subs, including some higher-end Polks (specifically, the PSW505, the F12’s main rival). I realize that everyone’s understanding of such things differs, but the port noise of the PSW108 was so bothersome to me that I didn’t even consider the PSW505.

    F12, on the other hand, was believed by many reviewers to be free of port noise, and I am pleased to say that these claims are, for the most part, justified. There is some barely detectable air-pumping noise that can be heard at high volumes, but it is not nearly as irritating as it was in previous subs I owned, and it is mainly contained in the lower frequencies. I can’t hear it at all with the port facing the wall. In reality, the sub behaves more like a sealed model when in “music mode.” Classic: organ, contrabass, and so on sound much more natural without the timbral augmentations I previously heard from a flapping bathroom sink stopper. New age, techno, industrial: maybe not as punchy and established as ideally desired, but quite good nonetheless. Just once during my music listening experiments did I hear a strange sound, which turned out to be a loose power cord flapping against the cabinet during the magnificent low D in BWV565. All was fine after I secured it. In a nutshell, I’m very impressed with F12’s musical skills.

    I’m not a big movie fan, so I don’t think I’m able to pass judgment. If a subwoofer is supposed to smash glasses, shake the coach with its owner, and help wall cracks spread for proper movie enjoyment, I’m afraid F12 falls a little short. To be honest, I didn’t buy it for that reason, and I don’t like loud noises. Even theoretically, at 150W RMS to a 12″ car, the F12 cannot be very noisy. Don’t get me wrong: with the volume turned up, it’s perfectly capable of shaking walls and triggering strange sensations in the stomach; it’s just not the kind of nauseating loudness that some people might anticipate from a subwoofer this big.

    A little more on the technical side of things. According to some critics, the F12 has a low frequency cutoff of 32Hz. This is not the case in my unit. At 32 Hz, I didn’t see any noticeable change in response. According to my measurements (not really scientific, but easily reproducible), the F12 has a peak response at about 90-100 Hz that gradually decreases to about 22 Hz, after which there is a cutoff. Even so, there is some discernible response down to about 16 Hz. At around 8 Hz, my unit stops responding. Below that, I’m not sure if it’s unable to reply at all, or if it’s due to flaws in my equipment/audio source. Regardless, I think this is a fantastic outcome for a $200 sub. It gets even better if your receiver has subchannel parametric EQ. If you can raise the volume at the lowest frequencies and change it so that it blends seamlessly with the main speakers, you can be able to obtain an almost flat answer at sub frequencies down to 25Hz and a decent response down to about 20Hz, giving you the best sound from your device. BTW, my system is based on the Onkyo TX-NR686, which has five adjustable points at the sub channel level and is capable of what I just mentioned (though I’d prefer it to be adjustable down to 16, not 25 Hertz).

  2. Simply put, I received more than I bargained for. I didn’t expect this much strength and clarity in such a small box…

    This sub-woofer completely blew me away. It took about two weeks of movie watching to get in, but they had already beaten the Polk I had previously owned.

    There is absolutely no boominess. It has a lot of bass, and I advise others not to put the volume up too high if you have a lot of delicate decor hanging on your walls or on shelves nearby… It will topple anything.

    I was never able to turn the knob past level 3 out of 10. The crossover function is error-free. The construction is Very Good, and the sound is musically accurate and POWERFUL.

    PROS:
    -Unrivaled sound quality for the price.
    -EXTREMELY POWERFUL BASEMENT Production.
    -It looks good, but its simplicity prevents it from attracting attention.
    -GOOD CONSTRUCTION.
    -The best PORT architecture available for under $400. There was no port rattling at all.
    -Flawless crossover configuration with a knob that can be adjusted.
    -PRICE, no other subwoofer competes with this one. There isn’t any.
    -I’ve had it for over 4 years and it’s still going strong.

    CONS:
    -It’s too powerful for me and my medium-sized bookshelf speakers.
    -It got dangerously hot during heavy use twice, and I couldn’t use it for more than 4 hours at a time. (However, this is to be expected from anything so strong and inexpensive.)
    -Length, in terms of weight and size (about 18 inches cubed), it is a little too large for me.

  3. When I first turned on this sub, the sound was boomy, lacked clarity, and was simply very loud. As a sound engineer, I knew that isolation and location were critical for a subwoofer to function properly. Play this through an Auralex Sub Dude HT. It’s better, but there isn’t enough isolation. I took one of the white foam packaging blocks that came with the BIC and put it under the Auralex Sub Dude HT, with the BIC F-12 on top. I moved the whole thing around the room until I reached its sweet spot, which was right in front of and in the middle of the TV in my case. Oh my goodness! Bottom sound is loud, clean, round, and fat. Set the volume on the BIC F-12 to 12 o’clock, the crossover to complete clockwise, and the mode to Pro Logic. She really came to life after I tweaked the AVR’s EQ to roll off the bottom a little bit. High-end audio is not a one-size-fits-all proposition. Take a few weeks to listen, adapt, listen again, adjust again, and try new albums and sound sources. Don’t be afraid to repeat as many times as needed. A Decade of Steely Dan, Ray of Light by Madonna, Number Ones by Michael Jackson, Phantom of the Opera sound track, and Loggins and Messina Be Free from their album Mother Load are among my favorites for sound setup. To each their own, but these albums are successful for me. I just want a second BIC F-12 now that my AVR supports two subwoofers.

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