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Shure 55SH Series II Iconic Unidyne Vocal Microphone
Pyle Classic Retro Dynamic Vocal Microphone - Old Vintage Style Metal Unidirectional Cardioid Mic with XLR Cable - Universal Stand Adapter - Live Performance Studio Recording - PDMICR68SL (Silver)
Nady PCM-200 Professional Classic Style Dynamic Microphone - Retro style vocal mic with carrying case, on/off switch, low-cut filter - Vintage look…
Monoprice Memphis Blue Classic Dynamic Microphone
Antique Vintage Classic Studio Church Theater Auditorium Speech Live Vocal 25mm Big Diaphragm Condenser Microphone Vlog Pc Mic
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Shure 55SH Series II Iconic Unidyne Dynamic Vocal Microphone (the Elvis Microphone)
Pyle Classic Vintage Dynamic Vocal Microphone
Nady PCM-200 Professional Classic Style Dynamic Microphone
Monoprice Memphis Blue Classic Dynamic Microphone
Darverson Antique Vintage Classic 25mm Big Diaphragm Condenser Microphone
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Shure 55SH Series II Iconic Unidyne Vocal Microphone
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Shure 55SH Series II Iconic Unidyne Dynamic Vocal Microphone (the Elvis Microphone)
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Shure
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$148.00
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Pyle Classic Retro Dynamic Vocal Microphone - Old Vintage Style Metal Unidirectional Cardioid Mic with XLR Cable - Universal Stand Adapter - Live Performance Studio Recording - PDMICR68SL (Silver)
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Pyle Classic Vintage Dynamic Vocal Microphone
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Pyle
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Nady PCM-200 Professional Classic Style Dynamic Microphone - Retro style vocal mic with carrying case, on/off switch, low-cut filter - Vintage look…
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Nady PCM-200 Professional Classic Style Dynamic Microphone
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Monoprice Memphis Blue Classic Dynamic Microphone
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Monoprice Memphis Blue Classic Dynamic Microphone
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Antique Vintage Classic Studio Church Theater Auditorium Speech Live Vocal 25mm Big Diaphragm Condenser Microphone Vlog Pc Mic
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Darverson Antique Vintage Classic 25mm Big Diaphragm Condenser Microphone
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Looking at a Vintage Shure 55 Microphone

after pulling this guy out of my storage and experimenting with it a couple of
weeks ago comparing it to my my new cheap microphone I figured I’d revisit
this guy and come dig a little bit deeper into it just just for the fun of
it it’s a neat piece of history so this one as I said I picked it up at a at a
secondhand store who had got it from a church that bought it back in well when
it was new presumably back in the forties or fifties or whenever that was
it sounds pretty weak and I’m I’m guessing some of that is just
degradation due to age and some of it the fact that it’s got a really well
output right now it’s probably due to the iron magnet in it losing its
magnetic properties over time as happens so this is the sure can we even see this
this is the sure model 55 with no apparent suffix supercardioid yoona dine
unidirectional dynamic microphone made by sure brothers of Chicago Illinois
over here there is a tag identifying the impedance and I’m having trouble reading
it but this particular model has an impedance adjustment switch here which
we’ll take a look at the spec the official specs in a minute but that
allows us to change the impedance that this microphone presents out the
connector to the amplifier or recording cone or whatever from a low of I think
it’s 50 ohms to a medium which is in the 150 to 250 range to a high which is in
the I want to say 10k range but we’ll look at that on the official you know
information in a minute so this one the basic microphone doesn’t have an on/off
switch the on/off switch is an ad a little module here which has the sure
brothers logo on it as well I cleaned this one up a fair bit when I first got
it it’s still not perfect but it’s got some vintage look to it let’s go and
take a look at some of the information that I found online about this guy so as
far as I can tell from the part number model number that’s on it and the clues
that I’m finding this is probably the 1947 model where the model was
introduced in 1947 because that’s when they added the impedance switch the
nameplate just says 55 I can’t see a five five six though it may be because
it does say on the tag supercardioid and the next major change that they made was
1951 where they changed the size of it to the small size and the added and XL
connector which this one doesn’t have so that pretty much dates it to somewhere
between 1947 and 1951 or possibly a little bit later but that would be the
manufacturer dates anyway I have no way of knowing when the church that
originally bought this thing picked it up but I’m gonna guess that somewhere in
that range so this is the data sheet for the 1951 model over the S the slightly
smaller one there are there were other versions SW with switch the gold version
which had a gold-plated finish which would look pretty gaudy and I don’t know
that I’ve seen any pictures of them although I’m sure they’re out there
somewhere as they’re saying they’re ideal for high quality public address
theater sound systems roll broadcasting applications and other sound
applications such as hotels stadiums and public auditoriums though I note in the
in this official sure document that has the history of it they’re talking in a
pre nineteen forty seven they’re talking about voice clarity and paging and
two-way radio systems they’re not even talking about broadcast or well maybe
his public address or live stage or any of that kind of
stuff so some of the reasons for the different impedances so 150 to 250 ohms
is what a typical microphone microphone these days comes in around it’s kind of
become the standard the low impedance is generally intended for a long cable
length so you don’t get as much induced hum into the into the cable and the high
impedance versions were for use directly into a tube-based amplifier which
typically do have a high impedance input just that’s the nature of the beast
however a lot of amplifiers and whatnot also have a transformer as the first
input stage for matching so tube amplifiers that were designed with a for
medium impedance 150 to 250 ohms would generally have a matching transformer
and as the front stage also a lot of earlier condenser microphone
preamplifiers to get the phantom power on they would
use a center tap on that transformer that way they could send the power out
to the microphone through the center tap and get it evenly the same positive
voltage on both pins two and three and then ground would be on pin 1 and that
would isolate the phantom voltage from the grid voltage the grid bias voltage
on the first tube input stage of course nowadays since no almost nobody is using
tube preamplifiers that’s not really done them so here we’ve got the general
specs some replacement parts and whatnot and again this is the switched model the
W which I don’t have on mine but it shows some
some ways to get into it to do some repairs and maintenance and down here we
have the typical frequency response chart and the cardioid pattern so this
is looking from above see most of the sound will come in from the front
there’s a little blip at the back but that is 10 DB lower than the peak at the
front that’s fairly wide compared to some microphones and here’s the
frequency response on a logarithmic graph you notice it’s relatively flat
from was that probably about 125 or so up to 1,100 Hertz and then it bounces
off about 4 DB higher than that until so it’s 1600 and then it craters right down
to 10,000 compare that to its modern cousin the ubiquitous a shure sm58 and
it’s a Lillian response is actually very similar it stays flat pretty much the
same but the drop off happened the high frequency drop off happens a lot higher
stuff at that little bobble in there though so if mine was in good condition
it would it wouldn’t sound yeah it wouldn’t have the high ends as much as a
58 would but it would sound reasonably close so and again this is looking at a
slightly more modern version the 1950’s version but there is the how the
impedance switching is done let me just grab that Zoomer tool here again so
basically it’s done with a transformer there is the actual microphone cartridge
no there’s the microphone cartridge over there there’s a matching transformer and
then the little switch just selects what’s going on when I first got this
one I said I bought it used they didn’t come with a cable or connect or anything
and I didn’t have available to me the correct fnl connector
I had I did have a four pin one so this is the shell off that and then I just
butchered up an xor connector to poke into the holes I’ll just pull this guy
out pin one of the ground and pins two and three so that’s that’s the original
connector that it should have for this age from the 1908 40s early 50s thing
and this little module here is just a switch so I should be able to I know I
can I haven’t been inside this thing for probably twenty something years since I
bought it but so there’s across the original wiring in there yeah that
hasn’t been moved in a long time gonna have to be careful but there is the
optional add-on switch it’s just a rotary on/off switch I want to be a
little bit careful that I don’t mess up that screw but it’s not in there very
tight anyway I think I just probably taken it with the coin it looks like
it’s designed for that exact purpose so there is how this guy actually
originally came or would have come without the optional switch so no
there’s four screws to get inside the head and I’m going to be careful because
I don’t want to damage anything and I’m not you know I’m gonna get a better
screwdriver than that there that’s a better fit as I said I don’t care about
the resale value on this thing because I’m never gonna sell it but I don’t want
to mess up something that’s this cool and old
so as for screws hold the grill on just drop them out and it’s not being I think
it’s just being held in there by friction and aid okay there we go so
there’s the grill off and the cloth is in pretty good shape a little bit of
Goodes and staining and stuff in here but I think a lot of that is actually
just the glue that holds it in so a little tiny tear in the cloth down there
that’s been there for a long time I’m gonna leave that mostly alone that mate
well I just dusted out a little bit but that’s about it
so here is the internals this foam back here is your shock mounting foam and
that that is something that I replaced about 20 years ago what was originally
in there was a similar density but it was really beat-up and just dry and
crumbly kind of like those that rubber there that rubber just sort of holds
this whole assembly back off the face a little bit in case it gets whacked so
there is the impedance matching transformer which we saw a little bit
about only on the website there on that manual there’s the two wires coming out
of the voice coil so this whole assembly oh hello
and look at that take in a second so that whole assembly
it’s held in by these two screws on the back simply bringing them out Oh what
was that covering and a half oh look back at the video and just see but
anyway there we have the whole mic capsule assembly that’s just the bracket
that holds it the whole thing is sprung for shock mounting I’m not going to go
in any further because it’s got this grill cloth glued on there but down in
there we can see the transients matching transformer and the switch and up in
there I’ll try and get a good view of that the original patent a 1946 so it’s
not much that I can do to this old fella to improve the sound of it other than
selecting the select and the correct the impedance for the preamplifier that I’m
using I’ll just gently put this guy back
together alright now that I’ve better reassemble though let’s see if it still
works hello one two three yes it seems like it does so this is set
to the a medium impedance setting well thanks for watching a pre sheet you’re
coming along for this little ride I hope you found this interesting I certainly
did I was like messing around with his old stuff anyway um you got anything to
to ask or say about this please leave it down in the comments as usual I’ll talk
to you later

Old-Looking Microphone Review

There are many different places to get vintage microphones in the United States and Canada. These places can include antique stores, thrift stores, flea markets, and many others.

If you want to get an old-looking microphone at a cheaper price you should try your local thrift stores. Many of these stores have used equipment for sale and they do not want it because it is no longer needed. They often have a selection of cheap microphones and other pieces of equipment for sale that you can take home with you.

If you want a more expensive vintage microphone you should head over to an antique shop. Antique stores are great places to find used equipment for any musical genre.

Another great place to get a vintage microphone is from a seller at a flea market. Flea markets are often filled with equipment for all kinds of reasons, but most people tend to collect rare items and collectibles.

If you are looking for vintage microphones for your band then you can try checking Craigslist. If you go to the site and search for your desired microphone then you will be surprised at all the options available. You will also see that Craigslist is an amazing place for vintage microphones because many sellers to post their items and you can just view all the different kinds of microphones for sale.

No matter where you decide to get your vintage microphone, you should make sure you do your research. The Internet is a great place to start your search and you can find a variety of options at very affordable prices.

Finding the right microphone is very important when trying to bring out the music in your band or recording a new recording for the radio. It takes a lot of skill and experience to be able to make a song sound great. The last thing you need to do is to have an instrument that sounds like a cheap piece of junk.

To make a great vintage microphone, you need to choose the right microphone. You want a microphone that has a nice quality tone that you will be happy with.

You may find that you will have to invest a little bit of money before you get your equipment for your next project. You will definitely get your money’s worth once you buy your vintage microphone. If you have a great time playing the instruments you play you will be happy with your purchase.

Vintage Microphones FAQ

Vintage microphone with stand

Looking for a vintage microphone with stand is not easy, but if you look hard enough you will find one. The internet is filled with interesting product auctions, from cameras to computer equipment and everything in between, so finding something vintage is not impossible. If you have been wanting a microphone to help you get the sound that you want, a stand might be just what you need to fulfill your dreams. It is important that you do not settle for any old stand, because even though you may have found a great deal on a vintage microphone, you may want something different or even a new stand altogether.

Many people do not realize just how important having a stand can be, so if you are having a difficult time finding a vintage microphone you are after you should consider purchasing a stand as well. You do not want to stick with any generic stand that you find in any store, because you want something unique. One of the best places to look for stands is through the internet because it allows you to look at hundreds of different vendors, all at once. Not only that, but you can compare prices and read descriptions and reviews of each item. There is nothing better than reading product reviews when trying to make a decision on something as important as a stand for your vintage microphone.

You will find that there are many benefits to owning a stand for your vintage microphone, so make sure that you do not skimp on this important purchase. Having a stand will allow you to place your microphone wherever you like, in a variety of positions. For example, if you are performing at an outdoor event, you will want to ensure that the stand keeps the microphone in a comfortable position so that the sound does not have to be pitched up or down. Also, if you are performing at an indoor event, you will want to make sure that the stand is sturdy and durable so that it does not break under heavy use. With a vintage microphone with stand, you will have something that will look good, perform great, and help protect your valuable investment.

Vintage radio microphone

A vintage radio microphone is an excellent collector’s item because the sound quality of these mics has not changed much in many years. Most of the vintage microphones that are available today were manufactured around forty years ago, when technology was very different. People back then could listen to their favorite radio shows through their transistor radios without having to worry about getting a signal interrupted by other noises. The radios that they used back then did not have the capability to handle high volumes, so they had to use their voices with just a bit more volume than necessary. As a result, the microphones worked well for these old time radio enthusiasts.

If you are looking for a vintage radio microphone, there are actually several different options to choose from. You can get one that will fit your particular need, or you can go for a complete all in one radio that can be used for both radio and music purposes. There are several different models of these microphones that you can choose from, so you should be able to find a microphone that will fit your needs as best as possible.

One thing that you will definitely want to make sure of before purchasing any type of vintage radio microphone is whether it works with the types of signal that you receive from your home radio. If you have an antenna that receives AM and FM signals, then you may not have much of a problem with the microphone you buy. However, if you only receive standard CD signals, then you might need something that receives these signals as well. This is important because you do not want to spend money on a great vintage radio microphone only to find out that it does not work with the types of signals you receive. Once you have this information, then you can make your purchase much easier.

Vintage ribbon microphone

The vintage ribbon microphone is a type of microphone that is known for its large sound that comes from its ribbon cables. Unlike the modern microphones that use electricity to conduct sound, these old microphones use a magnetic field to produce sound. These days, ribbon microphones are still used by most musicians and bands but if you are on a budget and would like to recreate the great sound of these old microphones, you can try making your own.

In order to make this work, all you will need are some ribbon wire, an electric guitar, and a vintage ribbon microphone that have the right specifications. Ribbon microphones usually have a diaphragm attached to one side of the cord that produces the sound. You have a few options when it comes to the design of your room, but the most popular is to have the cord encased in a plastic disk or something else so that it will be protected from moisture and noise. After you buy the right equipment, you simply plug your guitar into your amplifier and then start playing with it.

There are a lot of other types of microphones like the bi-directional ribbon microphone, cardioid microphones, and capsules that will also give you a good sound, but these two will have a bit different sound. With the bi-directional ribbon microphone, you will get a low level sound that is a little bit distorted because of the proximity effect. However, this is not always a problem because many people can’t hear it anyway. In contrast, the cardioid microphones will pick up on the sound of the person’s voice and reproduce it with a much better sound than the typical close microphone.

Vintage astatic microphone

The above mentioned information is based on my personal experience with vintage microphones. There is nothing in this article that will suggest that vintage microphones are bad, or that they are good. They are simply products that had use and showed their age. That does not mean that they are no good, only that you need to be careful when buying them and how you care for them. Most likely your microphone will come with a user’s manual, which will tell you how to care for it. Also please check unless otherwise stated in the user’s manual as to what kind of maintenance the product is recommended to do.

It is always a good idea to check with your physician before using any kind of medication or treatment, even over the counter medications, even over the counter remedies for that matter, unless otherwise specified in the user’s manual of the vintage astatic microphone. If you have any questions about the product, you should contact the manufacturer before using it. Please contact the manufacturer if you have any questions or concerns about the product, no matter how small they may seem.

Please remember that you must treat your vintage astatic microphone with care at all times. You should only use it when it is being used to record your voice. If you have questions about the product, you should contact the manufacturer. Please contact the manufacturer if you have any questions or concerns about the product, no matter how small they may seem.

Vintage condenser microphone

In the world of microphones, one type stands out above all others – the vintage condenser microphone. This is the kind of microphone that was used for over forty years and still continues to be used by professional musicians. The vintage condenser microphone offers several different features and benefits to those that want to use them but might not realize it. When looking for a microphone, it is important to consider all the options and weigh your options so you can make the decision that is right for you.

The first thing to know about the vintage condenser microphone is how it works. The diaphragm pushes up and compresses a piston that moves up and down in the case of a diaphragm. The piston moves up and down until it comes in contact with the plate of the diaphragm, which then pushes it down and seals it. The entire process is very similar to that of a cardioid microphone, only it operates at a lower volume and with a much tinier sound.

While the sounds from these mics are very unique and wonderful, they are not meant to be utilized on live performances where the volume is crucial to getting the tone you are looking for. Instead, these mics are best suited for recording purposes. They are also often used on acoustic guitars or other instruments that would not be practical to use live. For instance, if you are in the studio working on a track and need to mic the acoustic guitar without having it directly in front of you, using one of these mics is a great alternative. You have the control of the distance and the direction of the sound and can still achieve the quality sound you are looking for.

Pyle retro microphone

Shure has been around producing excellent microphones for many years, and with their Vintage Mic set, you can get all the quality that you need in a vintage microphone. The Shure Vibe is one of their more popular lines of microphones, and this particular model features a preamp as well as an active model. If you are looking for a great deal on a great mic, then this is definitely one of the options that you should take a look at. There are plenty of places online where you will find a great deal on Shure products, and if you want to know where you can buy one for a great price, then you simply need to search the Internet. With so much competition online, it is a great idea to do some research and see which site has the best deal available.

If you are looking for a vintage mic that does not break the bank, then definitely take a look at the Shure Vintage Mic. There are plenty of people that love using these types of microphones, and they have a great reputation amongst audio engineers, musicians, and vocalists. The mic has a very tight tonal sound to it, and it has the ability to capture great voice ranges. If you are looking for a cardioid mic that also works well, then the Shure Vintage Mic is a great choice. It does not have as much sound distortion as some of the other Shure models, and it has a great cardio sound to it.

If you are looking for a vintage mic, then make sure that you take a look at the Shure Vintage Mic. This mic rocks. It is perfect for those who are looking for a solid vintage mic with a great cardio sound. There are several different models that are available, and this mic works great with almost any vocalist or acoustic guitarist. You will be happy when you hear the great sound that this mic produces.

Last update on 2021-08-25 / Disclaimer: as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.