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Donner Reverb Guitar Pedal, Verb Square Digital Reverb 7 Modes Room, Hall, Church, Spring, Plate, Studio, Mod, True Bypass
Caline Digital Reverb Pedal Guitar Effects Pedal with True Bypass Aluminum Alloy Housing Snake Bite CP-26 Hall Reverb
Reverb Guitar Pedal,Stereo Effects Pedal 3 Modes Hall Spring Room True Bypass Guitar Mini Multi-effects Pedal Full Metal Shell
TC Electronic HOF Mini Reverb pedal
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Donner Digital Reverb Guitar Effect Pedal Verb Square 7 Modes
Caline Digital Reverb Pedal Guitar Effects Pedal True Bypass with Aluminum Alloy Housing CP-26 Snake Bit
MIMIDI Reverb Guitar Pedal
TC Electronic HOF Mini Reverb Pedal
BOSS Reverb Guitar Pedal (RV-6)
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TC Electronic
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$45.00
$58.98
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Donner Reverb Guitar Pedal, Verb Square Digital Reverb 7 Modes Room, Hall, Church, Spring, Plate, Studio, Mod, True Bypass
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Donner Digital Reverb Guitar Effect Pedal Verb Square 7 Modes
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Caline Digital Reverb Pedal Guitar Effects Pedal with True Bypass Aluminum Alloy Housing Snake Bite CP-26 Hall Reverb
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Caline Digital Reverb Pedal Guitar Effects Pedal True Bypass with Aluminum Alloy Housing CP-26 Snake Bit
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Caline
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Reverb Guitar Pedal,Stereo Effects Pedal 3 Modes Hall Spring Room True Bypass Guitar Mini Multi-effects Pedal Full Metal Shell
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MIMIDI Reverb Guitar Pedal
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TC Electronic HOF Mini Reverb pedal
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TC Electronic HOF Mini Reverb Pedal
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TC Electronic
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BOSS Reverb Guitar Pedal (RV-6)
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BOSS Reverb Guitar Pedal (RV-6)
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Choosing The Right Reverb Pedal

hey there it’s Andy with the reverb tone
report today I want to help you find
your perfect reverb pedal we all know
there’s plenty of offerings out there
with different feature sets and
different circuit designs so I thought
I’d break it down into some simple
categories and hopefully by the end
you’ll understand what you’ll need in
your rig a quick search for new and used
pedals on reverb will come back with
anything from analog spring tanks and a
small footprint to more ambient reverbs
with infinite decay and advanced
controls the first question you should
probably ask yourself is how much reverb
time do you require in your music if
it’s only about 3 to 4 seconds
chances are you could go with a spring
style reverb whether it’s analog or
digital is really up to your taste let’s
start off with an actual spring tank and
pedal form what’s great about these
units is that not only do they give you
that classic bounce and drip but you can
hit him hard with any kind of dirt and
they’re gonna respond in a pleasing way
since they’re still analog
spring tank emulators offer a similar
sound and a compact package such as this
wampler faux spring mini which uses
multiple delay lines to mimic the
complexity of a spring tank you can take
the realism even further with the sub
decay super spring theory ad tremolo on
top of vintage tones with the Strymon
Flint or take a deeper dive into the
powerful source audio true spring reverb
multimode reverb pedals not only up the
game with different reverb types but
generally start to give you more control
over various parameters and include
options like expression pedal inputs and
infinite or hold functions the ehx
Ocean’s eleven is a great example of a
budget multimode pedal that is still
compact while offering a variety of
spaces other examples in this category
would be the boss our v6 and mxr reverb
so let’s explore three modes that you
could pretty much find on any multimode
reverb pedal and that’s of course the
classic spring but also Hall and plate
taking a step in a more experimental
direction are reverbs that aim for
extended decay times laced with effects
such as modulation and pitch shifting
this Alexander space race offers pad
like textures that invite volume swells
and dreamy sound scapes other ambient
reverbs would be the walrus slow and the
Earthquaker devices after neath let’s
try a modulated reverb which as you know
doesn’t have any modulation in the dry
signal it’s just in the tails and in
this case the tails are pretty long
finally we come to reverb pedals that
can pretty much do it all from accurate
spring replication to shimmer and even
reverb mix with delay these powerful
processors offer more connections such
as MIDI stereo ins and outs as well as
spillover between presets the boss RV
500 is one that includes an LCD screen
for deep editing and preset selection
right at your feet other mega reverbs in
this category include the Strymon Big
Sky and Empress reverb let’s take
advantage of this pedals onboard presets
and switch between a classic shimmer
which is that octave up in the reverb
tails and something a bit more
traditional like a room weaver
well there’s your look at reverb pedals
from a simple analog spring all the way
to mega multimode designs and you can
find them all right here on reverb if
you’ve already found one be sure to let
us know how you use it in the comments
below as always thanks for watching

Reverb Pedals FAQ

Guitar reverb pedal

Guitar reverb is a very important effect in many types of music, because it adds additional space to the sound produced. It is present at the time you strum a guitar chord and plug your guitar into an electric amplifier. Because reverb effects help to create a distorted tone, they are also the most widely used kind of pedal currently on the market. But there are many different types of reverb that can be used in a guitar mix so it can be hard to know where to start.

To begin with, you need to understand the two main categories of guitar effects – attack and Decay. The Decay knob controls the amount of “downtime” that occurs during a playback. You can make the pedal feel looser or more compressed with a high Decay setting. For a more textured effect, try a low Decay setting. Attack is what controls the duration of the sound when you hit the pedal.

There are also special effects such as hall effects including spring reverb effects including room resonators. Spring reverb uses an air compressor which changes the volume and frequency of air as the pedal is pressed. Room resonators use air compressors to generate the” resonance” sounds in a room when you play a chord or switch up the guitar’s pickups. They are commonly found in rock songs. You can experiment with these effects with the various parameters for each individual effect knob such as attack time and spring rate.

Vocal reverb pedal

Vocal reverb basically takes the original audio signal and delays it at a pre-set level of milliseconds. But this reverb delay can’t go beyond a certain level without it being audible and distinguishable to your average person; typically, it’s delay as opposed to actual reverb where it sounds like waves crashing against the walls. This is because it’s impossible for an average person to hear a waveform that has been delayed more than a few milliseconds beyond the normal range of human hearing. You can’t add any waveform above 100ms in length to your signal without the sound getting distinctly digital sounding.

The problem is trying to find a good balance between the high and low end of the vocal solution spectrum. And trying to get the cleanest, most noticeable sound from any pedal/pedal combination is near impossible. It is my belief that the best vocal reverb pedal/solo pedal combinations are ones with a lot of delay on the lower end and very little on the high end. There are exceptions to this rule, but those kinds of pedal setups are few and far between.

For my favorite vocal reverb effects pedal setups, I usually recommend using one of the TC Electronic’s newest offerings, the Vocalsynth. This guitar pedal unit is one of the smallest and least intrusive on your sound engineering signal chain. It offers a unique blend of low and high bandwidth vocal reverb effects, along with useful vocal clarity and harmony enhancement. Using a TC singles voicetone r1 pedal setup, you can run a wide range of vocal solution sounds through your amplifier setup without disturbing the other sound devices like speakers and microphones.

Bass reverb pedal

The bass reverb pedal is an instrument that you really should have if you want to create that bassline that you hear so often in rap music or heavy metal music. Unlike other reverb units, which typically have a single tone and a spring-like tone, the Prussian Blue has a full range of five different sounds, each with a slightly different octave and thickness. This pedal works great for any style of music and any level of expertise because it sounds great regardless of where you place it. You simply control the level and not the depth, and you can use it at any moment. Of course, if you want to go heavier on the bass, you’ll simply turn up the volume a bit.

A lot of people think that the most complex bass reverb pedal that you can find is actually a guitar. This is far from the truth because a guitar will only be able to produce one note at a time, but it certainly is one of the most popular. The main reason why guitarists are so drawn to the reverb is because of its ability to give an instant, thick bassline without having to put a lot of effort into it. Guitarists usually use these pedals as part of a larger combo kit, but even if you just have it plugged into your guitar, the effect it will have is impressive.

One thing to keep in mind is that a bass reverb pedal is usually more suitable for producing softer bass tones than it is for creating the thicker sound that is characteristic of a real bass guitar. Many musicians who are just starting out may also want to consider learning one of these effects because it’s easier to control with one tool rather than two. If you already have experience playing bass guitar, however, using one of these pedals in conjunction with your bass guitar is highly recommended.

Analog reverb pedal

If you’re looking for a really cheap electronic instrument to replace your existing one, then an analog reverb pedal should be on your list. Even though both people who are talking about these are referring to 2 different pedals, the purchasing information for both is similar. You already understand that analog units produce a much better sound and are obviously higher in quality than their digital counterparts. Analog reverb units are not very expensive at all. You can even find good used ones on eBay.

Some examples of analog reverb units are compressor based ones, which take a compressor effect and turn it into a full on reverb. Basically it has two settings: “ducking” which removes most of the lower its frequency sounds and “self-oscaling” which gives you the desired sound. The first setting is great for ambient sounds like water falling on the beach or birds singing. Self-oscaling tends to give you a nice thick tone and the second setting will result in a very precise, flowing sound.

The analog reverb pedal is also great for using in a signal path. There are many instances in songs where you want a very specific, distorted sound. In situations such as this, the TC Electronic Hall of Fame reverb is exactly what you need. The Hall of Fame version has five different settings, and while it does have a true wet and dry simulation, the difference is minimal. This pedal takes a little getting used to, but once you do it you’ll certainly notice a big difference in your sound. Most guitar players use the Hall of Fame to get a certain vibe or tone.

Spring reverb pedal

Spring Reverb is a special type of reverb pedal. It’s used most commonly in pop songs by musicians. Spring reverb is characterized by “springs” – these are synthetic rubber bands wound on drum heads or somewhere else – that compress and/or reflect incoming sound. Reverb occurs when a note hits any hard surface and reacts back to the listener in varying amounts and intensities to produce an intricate echo, that carries sound information about that particular physical space. Spring reverb effects or pedals simulate or exaggerate real reverberations. They’re most commonly used on distorted guitars, though they can also be used with acoustic drums, in the middle section of keyboards or in the bridge/bass sound on bass lines.

Many guitarists who are new to digital music, may be unaware that there is more than one type of spring reverb pedal. In reality, there are only two types: the “real” spring tanks and the fake ones. Real spring tanks are typically made of solid plastic, stainless steel or aluminum. These kinds of units have a compressor which changes their volume according to the current level of the pad’s trigger. The fake spring tanks are usually made of hollow aluminum tubes filled with air.

Real spring reverb pedals tend to produce a true and realistic sound, while the imitations often produce less-than-real sounds. However, even though the quality of a spring reverb can vary widely, one thing that all real ones have in common is their durability. They can withstand heavy play over many years. The biggest problem with these kinds of units is their weight, which can put considerable strain on the guitarist’s fingers. Also, because of their weight, real units tend to be quite expensive, and some users have complained about the build quality of some imitation models being much lower than those of their trusted old guitars.

Mini reverb pedal

In addition to the popular and useful Black Ice mini reverb, there’s also the EX Mini Digital Reverb Pedal. This pedal gives you three different reverb modes in a single pedal. They are: Spring mode, Classic mode, and Reverse mode. These are all chosen via the large knob that controls which of the above three modes you select.

The first mode is Spring mode. This mode uses three spring sounds that bounce back and forth on the mid-section of your drum sample track. The Spring mode of the EX Mini Digital Reverb Pedal gives you a colorful, lively sound, which is perfect for hip-hop and rap music styles. If you are looking for a true and accurate reverb with a unique feel, this is the reverb pedal to get.

To take it a step further, the EX Mini Digital Reverb Pedal has what they call the Classic mode. This mode uses twelve different sounds and comes in a mellow, warm, and soulful tone. It’s great for older, harder rock and roll or classic reggae music styles. When you want to cut through the sound to create a thicker, more distorted, bass line sound, the EX Mini Digital Reverb Pedal is the one to get.

Stereo reverb pedal

A stereo reverb pedal is what you use to control the level and thickness of the sounds that emerge from a mono or stereo signal. Pedals offer a great way to expand the tonal diversity of your sound and give it something that cannot be achieved with an ordinary sound mixer. However, if you choose one that’s not ideal for your application, you might find yourself more frustrated than inspired. The good news is that there are many models and types of stereo reverb that can suit just about any style of recording and music. Some of these units can even incorporate different types of sound effects such as pitched voices, clapping sounds, feedback, and even random impulses.

One of the most popular models uses a conventional ADSR (Attack Decay Sustain Release) type of modulation to change the speed of the attack, which is usually set at zero. There is also a knob for limiting the modulation. The stereo reverb pedal has two modes – one with full randomly-generated modulation, and another with a fixed pattern of random attack/release/range/fade. There are also several different sustain parameters, which provide the option to vary the length of the generated sounds.

When using the stereo reverb pedal as a mono mode, you will need to activate the parameter so that the effect occurs. In order to change this mode to a stereo mode, you will need to activate the knob for the stereo delay. As mentioned above, there are several knobs to control the thickness of the generated sounds, which are useful for creating a wide range of textures. Some models allow you to manually adjust the levels and pan/tension of the individual sounds.

Reverse reverb pedal

Reverse reverb pedals are electronic hardware that serve as a special kind of sound mixing tool that can be used to create special sounds like a vocal, or guitar overdub, or other sounds with the help of two or more sound sources. Basically, the Reverse Percussion Pedal contains two types of sounds processing circuits. The first one is the high-pass filter that can cut frequencies by mid-range and allow for limiting, or enhancing certain frequency ranges. Meanwhile, there is also the low-pass filter that is basically a low-frequency filter that is sometimes added on to the high-pass filter to have a similar sound as it produces a lower frequency effect. When these two circuits are combined together, the result is the reverse of what they do in normal circumstances: the sound is multiplied and this is what you will hear when you plug the pedals in.

A simple way to understand what happens when you use a reverse reverb pedal is to think of what happens when you place your fingers on a piece of string with a tuned note on it and try to touch the string with your fingertips, without letting the string to vibrate. What you hear is the sound of the strings vibrating, if you are able to push them. The reverse of this is true when you do the same thing with a tone control knobs and when you listen to the resulting sound. With the addition of distortion, your sound will end up being multiplied. Basically, the higher the frequency of the sound being created, the greater the amount of the sound produced and the louder it will be. When the volume is set to maximum, the sound will be multiplied through the speakers, thus producing an extremely loud sound that can drive most people crazy!

The two sounds processing capabilities found on a typical reverse pedal are a true bypass pedal. A true bypass pedal only passes through a single signal when the trigger is pressed, preventing any further processing on that particular signal. A true bypass pedal is usually found on basses and guitars as the single-coil option is more preferred. The second mode of operation of the pedal, a true bypass, allows for true bypassing of one channel without touching another preset. True bypass pedals allow for the fullest sounds possible, but are usually used in conjunction with another type of pedal. A true bypass pedal may also have additional effects such as chorus, tremolo, reverb, or another similar effect.

Hall Of Fame reverb pedal

If you’re looking for a pedal that will define your sound like nothing else then look no further than the Hall Of Fame reverb pedal. Since their invention over fifty years ago, nearly every band with an extensive catalog of songs has used them at one time or another. Their popularity is well known and respected amongst professional musicians and sound engineers alike. Hall Of Fame reverb pedals have made a real difference in many peoples recording careers. They are designed to give you a true depth and thickness to the reverb which cannot be achieved by limiting yourself to one type of effect.

The Hall Of Fame reverb pedal is a modern creation of a design called “shimmering”. Many of us already know what shimmering means, but for those of you who may not, it simply means that the reverb pedal reacts to the pitch of the sound in question. In other words, it modifies the signal you send to the unit so that it has more options when it comes to producing the desired result. By allowing it to react to a variety of frequencies, the reverb pedal can produce a wide variety of effects, most of which are useful for creating the distinctive “clicking” of a drum loop or heavy accent sounds heard on top of bass and guitar.

With the help of a good tone print editor, you can easily create some amazing effects with your Hall Of Fame reverb pedal, but as you get more experienced you’ll probably want to fine tune your pedal to take on a whole new sound. Using a tone print editor to modify your existing pedal can make even the most complex sound easy to achieve. Once you’ve learned how to utilize your Hall Of Fame reverb pedal, you’ll probably wonder where you could get a hold of a Tone Print Editor like this one! The internet is obviously a great place to go, and there are plenty of quality programs out there that will allow you to customize your pedals in no time at all.

Behringer reverb pedal

The Behringer reverb pedal is an ideal product for the experienced or beginner electronic music producer to add classic reverb sounds to their next recording. The Behringer DR 600 is a true Digital Stereo Reverb Effect Pedal. The Behringer DR 600 delivers rich, heavy-duty, digitally interpolated reverb sounds with realistic vocals and instrumentals. The Behringer DR 600 has six high-resolution digital reverb patches that can be used in conjunction with other plugins for extremely heavy and distorted sounds. A compressor is also included with the pedal for creating tight, distorted sound effects. All these sounds are compressed using an exclusive compressor that boasts of two hundred and twelve Watts.

The Behringer DR 600 comes with three built-in plugins namely the’Halls’, ‘Spring’, and ‘Room’ compressors. Each compressor comes with an extremely sensitive preamp, which is great for spring reverb sounds, while the built-in limiting is perfect for the classic sounding rooms. The hall plugin provides the original and classic sounds from the Hall Effects Deluxe with new spring techniques. The springiness of this unit is due to the presence of a twelve volt Preamp driven by an internal amp of the Behringer. This hall compressor is useful when you want to achieve the original and vintage sounds of the Hall Effects Deluxe.

The Behringer reverb pedal has an extremely useful Master Switch which gives you access to a multitude of different sounds and modes such as Auto, Vintage, Cinematic, Natural, Relax, and Many more. With the Master Switch, you can also switch between eleven-tone equalizer which contains a variety of lush sounds such as Auto recolor, Cinematic shimmer, Natural light, Reflection, Multi-band filtering, and much more. You can use the Master Switch to change the sound from lush overdrive to something more melodic such as playback or even an ultra-soft touch.

Shimmer reverb pedal

Shimmer reverb pedal is a great addition to your sound arsenal. With the Shimmer reverb sound card you get professional tone from your guitar or synthesizer. Features: Super Bright, shimmering reverb pedal gets you right in the middle of shoegaze heaven. Effortlessly produce celestial reverb sounds with the built-in midi-pedal. Very intuitive 4-knockout knob including true bypass for maximum sound integrity.

The Ethereal Shimmer reverb knob adjusts the level and pan of the wet signal leaving you free to play with the dry sounds of your guitar or keyboard. This pedal also features two individual controls. The front control is used to change the level while the one located behind the sound card is used to control the pan. Foot pedal controls give you access to all of the different controls. These knobs are designed with a soft touch for a comfortable feel.

One thing you need to know about the Shimmer reverb pedal is that there is only one type of “shimmer” per channel. That means that each channel can play one type of shimmer, which can be monophonic or polyphonic. As we have said earlier, there are only two controls on the Shimmer knob and they are positioned high on the board. The front and rear panels of the Shimmer are covered with a clear cover to protect the unit. You can’t see any of the circuitry but the board housing has an insulating layer that reduces heat dissipation.

Last update on 2021-08-25 / Disclaimer: as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

3 verified buyer reviews
  1. This is the most flexible pedal I own, and it is truly amazing. I can’t believe the cost. You can literally enter any verb you like, from room to hall, spring to plate. It’s all in there, like Ragu! It also allows you to form the sound of your reverb. Some people will have a problem with this pedal because you have to dial in the sort of reverb you like, which takes some tuning. You can’t just turn on a spring or plate reverb and hear it. You must form it, which allows for a nearly infinite number of tonal reverb forms. In addition, the ambient tones in this pedal are fantastic for a reverb. Very tonal and spatial. I have a lot of fun with this stuff. I would assume that the knobs are initially difficult to turn (very tight). However, as you change them, they become smoother and looser. The build quality of the one I got is very fine. Aluminum housing with rubber stoppers attached to the bottom of the pedal. I can’t help playing with it now that I have it. In addition, there have been no sound problems with mine, such as crackling or noise. If you’re looking for a cheap reverb pedal, this is the one to use. Best pedal purchase I’ve ever made. I’d buy another one of their pedals in a heartbeat. It’s fantastic with my Katana.

  2. I purchased the reverb pedal. You’ll be surprised by how amazing this sounds. However, the LED on my first one failed, and the light on my second one occasionally fails. For this amount, I expect some flaws in the manufacturing. This business seems to have spent much more money on construction than on production. I’m just blown away by how amazing it sounds on my Moog Minitaur. I didn’t need the LED to work once I connected a power supply because the main advantage of getting a light is saving your energy. Otherwise, the tone indicates when it is turned on. All of that being said, if the rest of their pedals are this sweet, I would have to get more…and all I wanted was reverb. My guitar friends were asking me how many reverb pedals they tried before finding a good one. They couldn’t believe their ears when they heard this cheap Chinese pedal, and they were jealous because I had found another unbelievable offer.

    I’ve had this reverb for about a year now, and I still think it’s awesome. Unlike some other reviewers, I dislike the presence of the pedal. Fortunately, the pedal is inexpensive, so I had no doubts about painting it (a special color called silver-black). I also replaced the cream-colored knobs with transparent ones and added a clear Mooer Shroom button cap. The LED is so bright that these transparent sections don’t even need a light underneath them for the LED to give the knobs a little glow from the audience’s perspective.

    I’ve heard a lot of people groaning or making comments about the sound switch. I’m not sure why people are perplexed. The switch is there so you can have some wetness in your signal even though the knobs are all the way to zero (setting A). When I want to wash away my sound in the most amount of reverb, I use setting B, and when I want to use a smaller room reverb, I use setting A. Since I use this on a Moog with a wide tone range, I use the entire range of this pedal’s settings, with the exception of the spring reverb, which appears to be this pedal’s most common feature among guitarists. I guess I’ll dive into that setting at my gig this weekend.

    I’d like to hear more people compare it to its rivals, because this is the only guitar reverb pedal I’ve ever used. I have a TC Helicon vocal reverb that is OK but very cold and digital sounding in comparison to this.

  3. The pedal has a compact footprint and is housed in a sturdy aluminum alloy shell. All of the links, including the fuel, were strong and durable. The pedal is driven by a 9v adapter that is not included.

    You get 7 reverb modes that cover all the reverb styles you might like. You may change the reverb frequency, the decay, which determines the duration, and the tone or achieve darker to brighter sounds. The hall and church modes are great for wide open sounds. On the decays, the church mode sounds a little synth-like. The bed, spring, studio, and mod were my personal favorites. I got the best sounds out of these modes when I ran all pedal settings with my amp at around 11 o’clock, and Donner seems to get modulation correct in all of their pedals. I also found a punchiness while playing in all modes, almost as if a light compressor setting was added. I’ll be adding this pedal to the board, and it’ll be a welcome addition because my amp has plate reverb, which is my least favorite type of reverb.

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