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Makala Baritone Mahogany Ukulele by Kala (MK-B)
Cordoba 20BM Mahogany Baritone Ukulele
Caramel 30 inch CB103 Zebra wood High Gloss Baritone LCD color display Electric Ukulele Professional Ukelele Kit Beginner Travel Guitar Starter Pack Bundle, Padded Gig Bag, Strap and Wall mount Set
Kmise Baritone Ukulele 30 Inch Mahogany Ukelele 4 String Hawaii Guitar Uke G-C-E-A from Kmise
Ukulele Baritone Size Bundle From Lohanu (LU-B) 2 Strap Pins Installed FREE Uke Strap Case Tuner Picks Hanger Aquila Strings Installed Free Video Lessons BEST UKULELE BUNDLE DEAL Purchase Today!
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Kala Makala Baritone Mahogany Ukulele
Cordoba 20BM Baritone Ukulele
Caramel 30 inch CB103 Zebra Wood High Gloss Baritone Electric Ukulele
Kmise 30 Inch Baritone Ukulele
Lohanu Ukulele Baritone Size Bundle
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Kala
Cordoba Guitars
Caramel
Kmise
Lohanu
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$199.00
$139.99
$63.99
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Makala Baritone Mahogany Ukulele by Kala (MK-B)
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Kala Makala Baritone Mahogany Ukulele
Brand
Kala
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$94.99
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Cordoba 20BM Mahogany Baritone Ukulele
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Cordoba 20BM Baritone Ukulele
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Cordoba Guitars
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Price
$199.00
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Caramel 30 inch CB103 Zebra wood High Gloss Baritone LCD color display Electric Ukulele Professional Ukelele Kit Beginner Travel Guitar Starter Pack Bundle, Padded Gig Bag, Strap and Wall mount Set
Title
Caramel 30 inch CB103 Zebra Wood High Gloss Baritone Electric Ukulele
Brand
Caramel
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$139.99
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Kmise Baritone Ukulele 30 Inch Mahogany Ukelele 4 String Hawaii Guitar Uke G-C-E-A from Kmise
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Kmise 30 Inch Baritone Ukulele
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Kmise
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$63.99
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Ukulele Baritone Size Bundle From Lohanu (LU-B) 2 Strap Pins Installed FREE Uke Strap Case Tuner Picks Hanger Aquila Strings Installed Free Video Lessons BEST UKULELE BUNDLE DEAL Purchase Today!
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Lohanu Ukulele Baritone Size Bundle
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Lohanu
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$94.97
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How to Play the Baritone Ukulele?

hi there I’m Sam wood and today I’m
going to show you how to play the
baritone ukulele the baritone ukulele is
the largest and lowest sounding of the
abilities the sizes ranging from soprano
to concert to Tanner to baritone now
let’s get started
the baritone ukulele is a four string
instrument it can be plucked or strummed
to produce sound the four strings are
tuned to D G B and E now let’s play some
notes
let’s learn to play some simple chords
this first one is G major
next is C major
you
lastly we have D major
even with those simple three chords you
can play a whole host of different songs
I see a bad moon rising I see trouble on
the way
hey where we go days when the rains came
down in the hole playing a new game
knock knock knockin on heaven’s door
knock-knock-knocking on Levin’s
let’s learn a few more chords this first
one is a major now we’ll play a minor
up next is a major
and E minor
now you have everything you need to know
to pick up a baritone ukulele and start
playing thanks for watching and happy
strong

Baritone Ukulele Review

The two primary differences between baritone and soprano ukuleles is their tuning and their size. Soprano ukuleles, on average, is longer than baritone, which is around twenty-three inches long. This is not a rule that applies to all kinds of ukulele but it does apply to the more popular ones.

There are other differences that can be found in different brands, but the two most important ones are the size and tuning. If you know anything about ukulele, you probably already knew that the tuning is determined by the length and width of the strings. The tuning also depends on the tension that is placed on the strings, and that can be adjusted with the use of the tuning pegs. One way to tune your ukulele is by using a tuning pegs. However, tuning pegs are often difficult to hold onto while playing and this makes the process of tuning a ukulele much more difficult than playing a normal guitar.

Tuning a ukulele is much easier if the tuning pegs are easy to hold onto during play. However, tuning your baritone uke is quite different because the tuning pegs tend to be much easier to hold on to. To tune your baritone ukulele, all you need to do is get your tuning pegs ready and attach them to the pegbox of your baritone uke. Then, start playing the strings of your baritone ukulele slowly and pluck them all the way up.

Once the strings are up to a certain note, you can turn your tuning pegs to the left until they are flat. Now all you have to do is pluck down the strings at the beginning of each string change. For example, if you pluck the fourth string at the start of each string change, you will find that the fourth string remains flat throughout the entire string change. This flat pitch is what you are aiming for when you tune your baritone ukulele. If you don’t get it right the first time, just try again until you get it right.

Tuning your ukulele also needs to be done with the proper timing. If you have not gotten it right the first time, simply repeat the process until it sounds right. After you have successfully tuned your ukulele, the tuning pegs should be quite close to the pegbox. Just slide your tuning pegs back so that they are as far away from the pegbox as possible.

You can adjust your tuning pegs to your heart’s content because it does not have to be too big or too small. Tuning a baritone ukulele is much easier than tuning a regular guitar and much more enjoyable.

Last update on 2021-07-30 / Disclaimer: as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

3 verified buyer reviews
  1. I sold my Kala MK-B (branded Makala) as I was leaving Alaska and instantly regretted it. When I got back to my house in Florida, I went out and bought another one. The strings that come with it are not particularly fine, in fact, they are very bad. BUT I’ve discovered the best strings for restringing it: Ko’olau Mahana Baritone ukulele strings. These strings improve the tone and outlast the original strings by more than twice as long. Order them quickly because the wear on the original strings will quickly disappoint you. You would be pleased if you put these new Ko’olau Mahana strings on as soon as your original strings seem to be about to split. This baritone uke with new strings is constantly praised by other musicians who had no idea a ukulele could sound so sweet. It also looks amazing.

  2. I bought a Luna Tattoo tenor when I first became fascinated with ukuleles. It sounded okay, but it felt cheap and wasn’t fun to play. Knowing I’d never pick up the instrument and play it enough if I didn’t feel strongly about it, I returned it and instead spent a significant amount of money on a very good KoAloha tenor. I’ve played that instrument every day since I bought it, and it’s proven to be well worth the money, even as my first instrument.

    However, I finally decided that I wanted a soprano uke as well, for the flexibility of having two instruments with different tunings, portability factors, and sounds. I discovered that a couple of Cordobas, despite their low price, had nearly flawless customer reviews, unlike almost all of the other budget-oriented ukes available, so it was an easy purchase to make.

    I knew it was a quality instrument as soon as I took the 20SM out of the packaging and held it in my hands: perfectly balanced with a center of gravity where the neck meets the body (just like my tenor that cost more than four times as much), geared tuners that stay nice and tight, a perfectly straight neck with spot-on intonation all the way through the scale, and a richness that would make every listener swoon.

    No, no aficionado would mistake this for a handcrafted piece of art, but this uke looks, sounds, and performs like versions costing twice as much. You could easily offer this as a gift to a beginning musician, and they won’t be discouraged by a mediocre instrument.

  3. I’ve been playing stringed instruments for a long time, and I’ve made a few myself. I even do some light luthier work. There are a half-dozen acoustic guitars, seven ukuleles, a mandolin or two, a violin, and numerous other stringed oddities strewn about the building. I enjoy playing the ukulele, but anything smaller than a tenor is almost impossible for me to play with my big hands. I decided to try a baritone to see if I could finally find a uke that matched my hands, and this one does.

    I wasn’t expecting a decent instrument for less than $60. Typically, the intonation and action on instruments in this price range are poor, and I must spend time adjusting string height and saddle angles. The surprise was that after tuning it up, I tested the string height and intonation and discovered that they were completely perfect. That is nothing short of remarkable for an out-of-the-box instrument.

    This uke has a perfect, round, and friendly tone. Instead of the standard baritone uke tuning of DGBE, I used GCEA. On the sales page, an answer to a product query states that the uke is strung DGBE, which is incorrect. If you’re going to tune to standard baritone DBGE, I suggest investing in a collection of baritone strings. Kmise strings are fantastic, with the strongest being a collection of their reds.

    What I especially enjoy:
    **The frets are properly mounted, with no sharp extensions beyond the fret board (one of the selling points in the description),.
    **The frets are properly mounted, with no sharp extensions beyond the fret board (one of the selling points in the description),. It’s surprising that this selling point isn’t listed on the product page, given how important it is.
    **High-quality tuning machines and pegs with no drag, delay, or slip.
    **Playable up to the 19th fret.
    **Excellent stringing job.

    Something I dislike:
    **Nothing.

    Final thoughts:
    **As with any new nylon-stringed instrument, you’ll need to tune it up regularly in the first few days. It’s not the fault of the instrument or the strings. It’s because ukuleles, guitars, and other instruments are shipped with the strings loose to prevent temperature fluctuations (think -60F at 40,000 feet) from warping the neck or body.
    **It might be prettier with a little faux mother of pearl here and there, so who cares? This uke looks fantastic, sounds great, and is perfectly set up. What more do you like for less than sixty dollars?

* only verified buyers can leave a review.